Day: July 20, 2015

AU: Mango industry moves on quality standards

Australian Mango Industry Association: New recommendations for industry standards on harvest dry matter and retail brix that place a greater emphasis on delivering mangoes that match consumer expectations were announced at the 10th Australian Mango Conference.

The industry quality standards are focused on supplying mangoes to consumers that deliver on flavour. They aim to remove ambiguity and confusion over different quality specifications that are currently in the industry.

AMIA CEO Robert Gray said that the standards will ensure consumers get the best tasting mangoes and the standards are commercially achievable by growers.

Read Article →

Day: July 20, 2015

AU: Food Safety Improved by New Light Technology

New technology that uses different forms of light is being developed as a way to better improve food safety. This innovative technology has shown it can both extend the shelf life of food as well as reduce the amount of harmful contaminates.
Earlier this week the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) hosted the Where Science Feeds Innovation: Annual Meeting and Food Expo in Chicago.
Food scientists explored the new light-based technologies during a panel discussion on July 13 and used the opportunity to impart the warning that much more research still needs to be done in order to ensure that using the technology will not affect food safety.
Click here to read the full article from the Australian Institute of Food Safety.

Read Article →

Day: July 20, 2015

AU: Nurture vs nature at Cowra: Bringing up baby spinach for fussy consumer market

ABC Rural: Harvest of the largest crop of baby spinach in New South Wales is well underway on the outskirts of Cowra. Grower Ed Fagan said he’s nursed the 80 hectare crop to perfect condition, ready for the convenience salad market.

After the spinach is harvested it is sent to the processors to be triple washed, but before that Mr Fagan said he’d done all he could to ensure the spinach leaving his farm is perfect. “We can’t have animals roaming across here, we can’t use manure on this crop. Everything has to be spot on because we can’t have a food safety scare come from here.”

To help with quality control at harvest time, Mr Fagan is now working on an optical sorter to attach to the harvester that will knock out anything that’s below par colour-wise. “”At the moment we are trialling it so we don’t ever have any problems with foreign bodies like sticks or Poplar leaves. There’s more and more pressure on us now to make sure no one gets a leaf in their salad bowl.”

Read Article →