Skip to content

Posts from the ‘News: Traceability’ Category

CH: Food tracking system established in 58 cities

Xinhuanet: A food tracking system involving 86,000 companies and 524,000 merchants has been established in 58 big- and medium-sized cities across China, a spokesman with the Ministry of Commerce has said. The tracking system covers commonly-consumed meats like pork and beef, over 500 kinds of vegetables and some fruits as well as aquatic products. The establishment of the tracking system will help ensure food safety for consumers, Gao Feng said at a press conference.

CA: Canada’s SFCR mandates traceability

Produce Traceability Initiative: The Canadian government finalized regulations in June for implementing its Safe Food for Canadians Act of 2012, including traceability requirements. Growers, packers and shippers supplying Canada will need to comply with SFCR by January 15, 2019 to meet importer requirements. More information is available here.

AU: A barcoded apple is more important than you may realise

Food & Beverage Magazine: What is the significance of barcoding every single apple in a mountain of fruit at the supermarket? It seems a tedious process when an apple is surely just an apple. But, an apple is much more than what is seen at face value. It comes with a history – a place of origin, a past in which it was grown in specific soil and shipped in a certain container. This is valuable information, even for the humble apple, as a food recall could affect any product at any time.

AU: A barcoded apple is more important than you may realise

Food & Beverage Magazine: What is the significance of barcoding every single apple in a mountain of fruit at the supermarket? It seems a tedious process when an apple is surely just an apple. But, an apple is much more than what is seen at face value. It comes with a history – a place of origin, a past in which it was grown in specific soil and shipped in a certain container. This is valuable information, even for the humble apple, as a food recall could affect any product at any time.

AU: Australia’s agricultural traceability strengthened with new project

Food & Beverage Magazine: A national traceability project, which will help Australian farmers show the origins and quality of their produce, is underway. ​Australian minister for agriculture, David Littleproud, said the project would enhance trust in Australian-grown products and give farmers a competitive edge. ​”We’ll be able to more easily find where a biosecurity or food safety problem began so an isolated incident won’t impact a whole industry,” said Littleproud.

AU: Australia’s agricultural traceability strengthened with new project

Food & Beverage Magazine: A national traceability project, which will help Australian farmers show the origins and quality of their produce, is underway. ​Australian minister for agriculture, David Littleproud, said the project would enhance trust in Australian-grown products and give farmers a competitive edge. ​”We’ll be able to more easily find where a biosecurity or food safety problem began so an isolated incident won’t impact a whole industry,” said Littleproud.

AU: A barcoded apple is more important than you may realise

Food & Beverage Magazine: What is the significance of barcoding every single apple in a mountain of fruit at the supermarket? It seems a tedious process when an apple is surely just an apple. But, an apple is much more than what is seen at face value. It comes with a history – a place of origin, a past in which it was grown in specific soil and shipped in a certain container. This is valuable information, even for the humble apple, as a food recall could affect any product at any time.

US: Blockchain webinar: Discover the possibilities

PMA: Blockchain continues to be a hot topic, and it has developed beyond pilot programs to practical applications in the industry. In a recent webinar, we discussed how blockchain is being used today by retailers, grower-shippers and technology solution providers. This webinar includes: A recap of what blockchain is; How blockchain is being utilized to address today’s supply chain issues; and Opportunities, challenges and recommendations to get started with a blockchain program.

US: IBM Food Trust Expands Blockchain Network to Foster a Safer, More Transparent and Efficient Global Food System

New York Business Journal: IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced growing adoption of its food supply chain network, IBM Food Trust. The blockchain-based cloud network offers participating retailers, suppliers, growers and food industry providers with data from across the food ecosystem to enable greater traceability, transparency and efficiency. The network is now generally available after 18 months in testing, during which millions of individual food products have been tracked by retailers and suppliers.

AU: How to tamper-proof Australia’s $44 billion food export trade

Australian Financial Review: Food trust and safety is as much an economic opportunity for our country as it is a risk. We stand to benefit from a growing middle class looking for premium products steeped in narrative. Yet that same narrative could see Australia become a victim of the growing fake-food problem. Given our economy’s reliance on agriculture, we need to move quickly to get our fill.